Tag Archive: Whales


http://www.bluewaterventures.org

Our school field trips to the protective water of Pillar Point harbor sometimes have some real surprises. During the fall of 2016, Humpback whales were consistently seen lunge feeding near shore where students could observe safety from the jetties. An amazing teaching opportunity!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Launching from Pillar Point Harbor, we’ll have a leisurely paddle through the protected and scenic harbor. Cormorants, pelicans, terns and harbor seals join us for our naturalist-led field trip. Across the harbor we can beachcomb, explore tidepools and have a shore lunch before paddling back.

A very popular activity with students is pulling a large seine net to examine our catch and continue our discussion of animal adaptations. Teachers, please feel free to call us to discuss curriculum ideas in greater detail.

The cost of your field trip is $48 per person with a complimentary trip for one teacher chaperone. $50 per person weekends.

Hope you can join us!
Kim Powell, MRPA
Owner, Operator & Naturalist
Blue Water Ventures
phone & fax: (831) 459 8548
email: bluewaterventuressc@gmail.com
website: http://www.bluewaterventures.org
127 Mason St, Santa Cruz CA 95060

Encounter with a Humpback Whale

The California population of humpback whales may exceed 50 feet in length and weigh over 80,000 pounds. When food is available, they may consume over 4000 pounds daily trapping their prey in fringed baleen plates that hang from their upper jaw. Humpback whales that give birth in the South Pacific region of Tonga feed in the rich Antarctica polar region and may weigh as much as 50 tons or 100,000 pounds.
Dipping into the indigo blue deep water around the islands of Tonga, it was somewhat difficult to grasp how big these incredible mammals were. Snorkeling next to them it was clear you were with one of the biggest animals on earth but size was harder to determine against the deep blue background. However, during one memorable swim a mother humpback whale glided below us to escort her calf away from the potentially dangerous shallow reef that the young whale was heading for. As the mature female whale cruised below us we could see how massive she was against the shallow reef. It was truly one of those moments of awe and wonder watching a graceful, gentle and gigantic creature care for its young calf. Join our next Whale encounter in the lagoons of Baja with http://www.bluewaterventures.org

Humpback Whales of Monterey Bay

Outstanding close encounter with a mother and calf Humpback whale today!

It is  a truly remarkable  honor to live on the edge of Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

DSC01947 DSC01931 2Coined the “Serengeti of the Sea”, Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary lies within a biologically rich pathway intersecting the migration patterns of an array of marine mammals, sea birds and even our planet’s largest sea turtle, the leatherback. 34 species of marine mammals are found within out extraordinary sanctuary, the largest federally protected marine reserve in the United States.

Several days ago on a naturalist-led adventure with Blue Water Ventures we kayaked among a dozen Humpback Whales. Reaching a length of 45 feet and weighing 80,000 pounds we were truly humbled by their gentle presence.

Today was another outstanding day aboard Sanctuary Cruises as we experienced an array of whale behavior from pectoral slapping, tail slaps, lunge feeding and a spectacular double breach. Using a hydrophone we could hear the underwater vocalization of the humpbacks and above water the erie sound of  trumpeting whales. Humpback whales  are known to trumpet, a  shrieking balloon like  sound emitted through their blowhole when under stress such as an predatory attack or when excited by food.  The abundance of anchovies  In Monterey Bay right now seemed to be a reason to celebrate! Join us on our next naturalist-led adventure with Blue Water Ventures.DSC01984 2

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ADSC00723Once again, “pinheads” what the local fisherman call immature anchovies, have moved close into the Bay attracting an array of predators from brown pelicans to humpback whales.

 

DSC00739We thought that perhaps the whales were on their way to the coast of Mainland Mexico where they will give birth and care for their calves before making the journey back to our coast to feed. With these tasty anchovies still around, so are the whales. Enjoy the frenzy while it lasts! http://www.bluewaterventures.org.DSC00709

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Every february Blue Water Ventures travels to the whale breeding lagoons of Baja teaming up with our incredible local outfitter, Mar Y Aventuras. For 10 action packed days, we snorkel with sea lions, observe reef fish, sea kayak, beachcomb and hope for a ‘friendly” encounter with the California gray whales of Magdalena Bay.

Gray whales are known to be friendly at times, intentionally seeking interactions with humans. It is entirely the choice of the whales that reach 50 feet in length and 80,000 pounds, far greater than our tiny ponga boats.

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This underwater footage of two California Gray whales was captured by Kim Powell, owner, operator and head naturalist of Blue Water Ventures based in Santa Cruz, CA.

Find out more about our naturalist-led adventures at http://www.bluewaterventures.org

I hope you might consider joining us as we explore Baja, from desert to sea!

Kim Powell is owner, operator and head naturalist at Blue Water Ventures in Santa Cruz, CA. Offering naturalist-led field trips for students and adventurous vacations designed to be relaxing with an educational component for women. Kim has been organizing single and multiple day excursions to extraordinarily beautiful places since 1985

Sincerely, Kim of Blue Water Ventures

 
 

www.bluewaterventures.org

Join Blue Water Ventures as we search for whales abd wildlife in the incredible Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary!

Here’s what happened today, May 6th 2012

Took my neighbors out for a early morning paddle to check out our local sea otters when we encountered 2 mama gray whales and their babies resting in the kelp beds off of West Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. 

Our first encounter really caught us off guard as a baby whale surface 25 feet from our boat. We had just been enjoying activity off of seal rock when a baby whale popped up without any warning. Very incredible! 

We quickly backed up, tapping our boat letting the youngster know our location.

As we were heading back towards Cowels Cove, two more gray whales suddenly appeared without any warning as seen in this video. They seemed to be resting in the kelp beds and clearly spyhopped to check us out.

Whales are known to raise their heads out of the water to take a look around, a behavior referred to as spyhopping. They may have been intrigued by not only us, but the surfers who were just beyond the whales.

What an amazing day and its not even noon!