Tag Archive: whale watching


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Encounter With Friendly Humpback Whales of Tonga
The South Pacific Nation of Tonga is one of the few places in the world where in water whale encounters are officially sanctioned.
Humpback whales were hunted to near extinction in Tongan waters until 1978.
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Today a whale watching industry is helping to stimulate the local economy and the majestic whales are fully protected. The level of interaction was dictated by the whales. As we backed away they approached closer.
As we slid into the water, two presumably adolescent male humpback whales initiated a close encounter with us.
We departed Tonga with a sense of profound awe and appreciation.
Thank you to the kind people of Tonga and to the magnificent humpback whales.
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Orcas of Monterey Bay

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Orcas of Monterey Bay…..Finally after many years of searching, we found Orcas! 32 women on our private Blue Water Ventures charter with Sanctuary Cruises got to witness an unbelievable show! Several pods of Orcas, also known as killer whales had converged together south of Moss Landing.

Thanks to the amazing crew at http://www.sanctuarycruises based in Moss Landing. Join our next adventure in search of sea otter pups and baby gray whales next weekend at http://www.bluewaterventures.org!

murreswww.bluewaterventures.org.
DSC01173While yesterday’s whale encounters were awesome, there’s so much more to the story right now as species are gorging on the abundant food in Monterey Bay National Marine Sancturay. The young Common Murre chick survived the great plunge perhaps from the cliffs of Devil’s Slide towering 1000 feet over the Pacific. As it glided down and “hit” the water, the father Murre waited patiently for the chick’s first encounter with a salty world. For the next several months, “Dad” and off spring will be an insperable pair as the young chick learns how to dive, forage and avoid predators. Diving over 100 meters in depth using its wings to ‘fly” underwater, they search for prey items such as krill, squid and fish. 10,000 or more Common Murres drowned in gill nets during the 1970’s-1980’s. Thousands more were loss in Northern California during a tragic oil spill event in 1986. Successful Adaptaions include a uniquely shaped pointy egg which helps prevent it from rolling off the bear cliffs where these fascinating birds nest. (photos were taken using a telephoto sony lens then cropped with http://www.bluewaterventures.org).